November 17, 2019

The Power of Invention

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We hear a lot about “power” and “energy” in our world on a daily basis, but do we ever step back and really think about what those qualities are? Power and energy are forces that work in the physical world to drive machines and whole industries, as long as they are harnessed in a way that is useful. An early example of the harnessing of electrical energy comes from the story of Thomas Edison creating the first light bulb filament, which allowed him to create light indoors. From this effective harnessing of electrical power, a whole revolution began, which has been continuing on ever since.

The Power of Ideas

The idea of harnessing this type of power is so compelling, the stories keep getting told over the eons. Who can forget the legendary story of Benjamin Franklin harnessing the power of a lighting bolt by attracting it with a metal key? Both of these legends center on the idea of an inventive person using their own curiosity and “brainpower” to access a physical power the world really needs energy analyzer.

Today, the stories of Franklin and Edison may seem quaint and old-fashioned, yet their ideas brought forth the computer revolution we are experiencing today. In much the same way that Edison came to his breakthrough moment, so did computer revolutionaries like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs. Both of those inventors werw able to see past old ways of thinking and venture into something new.

After Edison harnessed the power of electricity, the floodgates of invention broke loose, and soon we had inventions of every kind being released into an eager marketplace. Radios and record players soon became standard possessions for households everywhere, and televisions soon became “must haves” in every home as well. Just about twenty years after most American homes had television sets, those first home computers were being developed by Gates and Jobs, and the revolution truly came to be.

Today, most people can’t imagine going a day without their personal Smart phone, but do they ever stop and thank Edison and Franklin for making it all happen?